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The Modern Workplace

The Modern Workplace

Posts in Employment Law Updates.

The new federal administration continues to put its stamp on the development and enforcement of wage and hour laws under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Recently, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued a new Field Assistance Bulletin (Bulletin 2021), revoking a Trump administration policy relating to the practice of seeking liquidated damages in pre-litigation settlement discussions.

Employers who violate the FLSA provisions relating to minimum wage, overtime compensation, and protections for tipped employees, are liable for the unpaid wages or tips as well as an equal ...

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The gig economy is an industry that is generally characterized by the prevalence of short-term contracts, freelance work, and indefinite flexible working arrangements. It also usually comes with getting work through some type of online or app-based digital platform. The unifying factor in all of these companies is that they are managing independent contractors and freelancers who have signed up to perform task services for the ultimate end user. From a legal perspective, this is very different from the traditional employee model. In a recent podcast, we explored the impacts of the ...

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It comes as little surprise that the new administration in Washington is contemplating changes to laws and rules affecting employers. Early hints about changes that might be in store began to appear already on Inauguration Day. These included a regulatory freeze issued by the White House in the form of a non-binding memorandum to federal agencies. This freeze, which is aimed at halting pending regulatory changes while the new administration takes time to assess them, may affect the Final Rule on Independent Contractor status about which we wrote in this space on January 14, 2021. We ...
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Whether we realize it or not, we all have unconscious biases - even scientists who are trained to overcome them. Events of the last year have riveted our attention not only on a global pandemic, but also on race relations. Addressing this topic is important to us all - in our businesses and beyond. Unconscious bias training helps us understand why we harbor biases, how to avoid bad decision-making associated with those biases and how to promote greater inclusivity. 
The problem with unconscious biases is we don't see them. As Henry Thoreau said, "Many an object is not seen, though it falls ...
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We will undoubtedly remember 2020 for reasons completely unrelated to employment law. However, the State of Illinois experienced a few changes that went into effect on January 1, 2020. This post intends to provide a quick reminder of a few of the new requirements facing employers since the start of the new year.
Workplace Transparency Act

Candidly, the Workplace Transparency Act (WTA) deserves a post all its own, but since this is a blog post and not a treatise, I offer a few (but importantly, not all) of the highlights of the new WTA:

  • The WTA expanded the definition of discrimination under ...
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This week, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed First Amendment protections for religious institutions in the hiring and firing of employees who play an important role in carrying out the institutions religious mission. In Our Lady of Guadalupe School v. Morrissey-Berru, the Court upheld the dismissal of employment discrimination claims brought by two teachers against their Catholic school employers under the ministerial exception, a legal doctrine that prohibits courts from getting involved in employment disputes between religious institutions and their ministerial ...
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On June 15, 2020, the United States Supreme Court handed the LGBTQ community a major victory. In Bostock v. Clayton County and companion cases, the Supreme Court held that an employer who terminates an individual for being homosexual or transgender violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

 

The Courts ruling involved a trio of cases, with each employee filing a lawsuit under Title VII alleging discrimination based on sex. Title VII applies to employers with at least 15 employees in each of 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year and makes it unlawful ...

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The Supreme Court recently heard oral argument in a series of cases that will determine whether federal employment discrimination protection extends to sexual orientation and gender identity. The Courts decisions in the cases could have a far-reaching impact on employers nationwide.


Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex and national origin. At issue in the trio of cases currently before the Court is whether sex applies to sexual orientation and gender identity. If it does, gay, lesbian, and transgender ...
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A note of caution to Minnesota-based employers federal enforcement of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) should not be your only concern when drafting employee compensation plans; the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry is actively auditing employers in search of those avoiding their overtime requirements under the Minnesota Fair Labor Standards Act (MFLSA). This past Wednesday, the Minnesota Supreme Court upheld a million dollar compliance order issued by the Department against an employer utilizing split-day compensation plans. The court heldthat an employer must ...
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As we discussed in prior posts (MinnesotasNew Wage Theft Law: Are You Prepared? and Minneapolis Wants a Piece of the Wage Theft Pie), Minnesotas 2019 legislature passed expansive new wage theft protections for employees. Most of the new laws provisions became effective July 1. The new criminal penalties for intentional wage theft are effective August 1. While the new law contains numerous significant changes to wage-related notice and recordkeeping requirements, payment of commissions and bonuses is also affected and deserves an employers close attention to achieve compliance ...
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Although the recently completed 2019 regular session of the Minnesota Legislature included a significant number of bills on various employment-related topics, in the end, the Legislature passed very few such bills. The future fates of those bills are quite unclear at this time. As of the close of the regular legislative session, numerous employment-related bills were still active, in either one or both legislative bodies, touching on a variety of significant topics, including:

  • Paid leave (generally).
  • Medical leave.
  • Family leave.
  • Work shift scheduling requirements.
  • Wage theft ...
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In a highly anticipated 5-4 decision, in which Justice Gorsuch cast the deciding vote, the U.S. Supreme Court overruled its own previous case and held today that a labor union may not require employees in the public sector to pay for its services. The decision, Janus v. AFSCME Council 31, may significantly weaken unions operating in both the public and private sectors and throw labor relations between government workers, their employers, and their unions into turmoil.


Until now, the Courts 1977 decision in Abood v. Detroit Bd. of Ed. had permitted public sector unions to compel payment ...
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As previously reported, a Hennepin County district court judge ruled earlier this fall in a class action case against Surly Brewingthat an employee tip-pooling agreement made with employer coercion or participation violates Minnesota's wage and hour law. Now, the Minnesota Supreme Court has found that Minnesota's wage and hour law expressly permits a private cause of action for an employee who is discharged for refusing to share gratuities.
 
The Minnesota Supreme Courts ruling was issued this week in Burt v. Rackner, Inc. d/b/a/ Bunnys Bar & Grill. The plaintiff, Todd Burt, alleged ...
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A high-profile Minnesota employer, Surly Brewing Company, has been found liable in a state court class action for violations of Minnesota's wage and hour statute governing the pooling of employee tips. The amount of damages has not yet been assessed but the class of employees who stand to receive payment from Surly under the ruling appears to number in the hundreds. Given the prevalence of various kinds of tip pooling in the hospitality industry, a great many Minnesota employers may be at risk for similar litigation under the tip pooling statute. At a minimum, an employer whose ...
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As expected, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton has vetoed legislation passed by the Minnesota legislature that would have preempted local governments ability to enact laws that set wage, vacation, or sick time requirements, or other employment benefit levels higher than those set by state-wide law. The vetoed legislation (the Uniform Labor Standards bill) was passed by the Minnesota state legislature late last month and was perceived, to a great degree, as a response to the enactment of Minneapolis and St. Paul city ordinances creating mandatory sick leave benefits for employees ...
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While most of the nation has been focused on the potential repeal of the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill this week that could, depending on its progression, drastically affect overtime pay practices in the private sector. The bill, dubbed the Working Families Flexibility Act, would allow private employers to offer paid time off instead of overtime pay to compensate non-exempt workers for overtime hours. Public employers already have the legal right to offer such comp time as a form of overtime pay, but private employers do not.
 

Not surprisingly ...

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Last week, President Trump signed four bills passed by Congress under the Congressional Review Act. The effect of each bill is to roll back regulatory actions adopted in the late days of the Obama administration. Of particular interest to employers who are federal contractors, one of the bills permanently blocks implementation of the Blacklisting Rule, otherwise known as the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Order, which was designed to bar companies with serious or repeated employment and labor law violations from receiving federal contracts and to address wage theft and other pay ...
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On January 30, President Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch to fill the Supreme Court seat that has been vacant since Antonin Scalia's sudden passing in February 2016. You may recall that President Obama previously nominated Merrick Garland to fill this seat, but he was never confirmed because Senate Republicans refused to hold a confirmation hearing.  Gorsuch is currently a judge on the U.S. Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, which has jurisdiction over federal court cases in Colorado, Utah, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Wyoming, and Kansas. He received his undergraduate degree from Columbia ...

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The Minnesota Court of Appeals recently clarified that an employee who is fired for refusing to comply with an employers unlawful tip-sharing practice can sue for wrongful discharge under the Minnesota Fair Labor Standards Act (MFLSA) and seek monetary damages, including back pay. In Burt v. Rackner, an employee of Bunnys Bar & Grill (Bunnys) was told that he needed to give more of his tips to the bussers, and that there would be consequences if that did not happen. That did not happen and Bunnys fired the employee for not sharing his tips with other staff.
The Court ruled that the ...
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The Federal Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA), which was featured in our blog post last week, was signed into law by President Obama on Wednesday, May 11, 2016. As discussed in last weeks post, this important new federal law offers another avenue for employers to protect their valuable trade secrets. The DTSA creates two significant benefits for companies: (1) consistent and uniform law nationwide; and (2) guaranteed access to federal courts. It also provides for injunctive relief and additional monetary remedies. Now that the DTSA has been signed into law, companies seeking the ...
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As noted in a previous blog post, Justice Scalia's sudden passing last month will have a big impact on how key labor and employment cases are decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. On March 16th, President Obama nominated Judge Merrick Garland to fill Justice Scalia's seat. Judge Garland is currently the Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (D.C. Circuit). The D.C. Circuit is a primary forum for challenges to administrative actions, including actions by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). This means that Judge Garlands judicial record is of ...
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Regardless of ones political views, the passing of a sitting United States Supreme Court Justice always has the potential to create major waves on the waterfront of federal law. But the recent death of Justice Antonin Scalia, in particular, could have significant implications for employers. There are currently several cases pending before the Supreme Court that raise important employment and labor law questions. The potential voting shifts that always follow a reconfiguration of the Supreme Court could impact the ultimate outcome of those cases.

Just a few of the employment and ...
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Last week, President Obama made headlines when he announced a forthcoming executive order to ban the box on federal job applications. The President directed the federal Office of Personnel Management to modify its rules for federal agency hiring decisions to delay questions about an applicants criminal history until later in the hiring process. While many federal agencies have already taken this step, the Presidents action will make the ban the box practice universal for federal government hiring. In making his announcement, President Obama cited statistics indicating that 70 ...
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As anticipated, President Barack Obama celebrated Labor Day by issuing an executive order mandating that federal contractors provide paid sick leave to their employees. The executive order requires that federal contractors and subcontractors provide their employees up to seven days of paid leave per year for themselves, to care for a sick family member, or to address domestic violence and stalking situations.

President Obamas order is the latest in a series of executive orders aimed at federal contractors as the administration tries, so far unsuccessfully, to get broader ...
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Continuing his pen and phone approach to effecting change, The New York Times announced last week that President Obama is considering using his executive authority to mandate paid sick days for federal government contractors and subcontractors.

The draft executive order, which is marked pre-decisional and deliberative, would require a minimum of 56 hours (or seven work days) per year of paid sick leave for employees of federal contractors and subcontractors. Under the draft executive order, the paid sick leave would allow an employee to take paid time off to care for themselves or a ...
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The U.S. Supreme Court announced another eagerly anticipated decision last Friday, ruling that gay and lesbian couples have a fundamental right under the U.S. Constitution to marry. The Courts decision in Obergefell v. Hodges follows decades of advocacy by groups favoring and opposing same-sex marriage, as well as ramped up legislative activity and court battles over the legality of same-sex marriage in recent years.

The cases before the Supreme court involved state laws from four states Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee -- that defined marriage as the union of a man and a ...

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The U.S. Supreme Court announced its much awaited decision today in the case of King v. Burwell. In its ruling, the Court upheld a key provision in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that provides government subsidies for health care insurance for all Americans who qualify, regardless of whether the coverage is obtained through a federal or state run health care exchange. The Courts decision affirmed an earlier decision in the case by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and endorsed the view of the Obama administration that subsidies should be available for all lower and ...
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As distribution of medical marijuana is set to begin in Minnesota on July 1, 2015, a new ruling from the Colorado Supreme Court further clouds the air for employers attempting to handle the employment ramifications of marijuana use in the twenty-four jurisdictions now permitting marijuana use.
 

On June 15, 2015, the Colorado Supreme Court held that an employer was permitted to discharge an employee due to his licensed medical use of marijuana at home during nonworking hours. In the case, Coats v. Dish Network, the employee had worked for the employer for three years before he tested ...

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A hiring policy based on looks is like nails on a chalkboard to an employment lawyer. So it comes as no surprise that the "Look Policy" of an Abercrombie & Fitch (A&F) store caused A&F trouble before the Supreme Court last week when the Court found in favor of the EEOC on a charge of religious discrimination against the clothing retailer. However, the decision has implications that reach beyond image-based hiring and sets standards of proof for religious accommodation claims and Title VII generally.

The Court's 8-1 opinion held that an employer need not have actual knowledge of an ...

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In an update to a previous post, the highly anticipated United States Supreme Court decision in UPS v. Young was announced last week. In a 6-3 decision, the Court vacated rulings of the district court and the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, both having issued summary judgment in favor of UPS. The Court remanded the decision to determine whether the policies of UPS were legitimate and nondiscriminatory. The Court stated the Fourth Circuit had not yet considered the combined effects of UPS' other accommodation policies or the strength of UPS' justifications for the ...
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On Monday, the current Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (and chairman in the next Congress) Lamar Alexander issued a report critical of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commissions (EEOC) litigation tactics and management. Among other concerns, the report found that:
Todays EEOC . . . is pursuing many questionable cases through sometimes overly aggressive means and, as a result, has suffered significant court losses that are embarrassing to the agency and costly to taxpayers. Courts have found EEOCs litigation tactics to be so ...
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Minnesota recently became the 22nd state to legalize medical marijuana use and, as part of the new law, to enact new potential employment protections for registered users of medical marijuana. Minnesota's new marijuana law has already gone into effect, but distribution of marijuana for medical purposes is not expected until July 1, 2015. Employers should use this extra time to familiarize themselves with Minnesota's new law and its potential implications. While the new Minnesota law purports to impose some new employment law obligations on employers, it also raises many ...

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Technology's impact on privacy took center stage in news headlines this week. The New York Times and National Public Radio (NPR) both reported on alternative software tools to track employees in the workplace - one tool identifies inside security threats and another tracks employee productivity. Our blog post earlier this week also discussed this issue, highlighting both upsides to employee monitoring and some of the downsides and risks. In addition, there was big privacy news coming out of the United States Supreme Court this week. In a highly anticipated ruling, the Court ruled ...

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The Star Tribune is reporting that Minnesota legislators have reached a deal that will increase Minnesota's minimum wage for most employers to $9.50 per hour by 2016. When the proposed law is passed and signed by Governor Dayton, Minnesota will join 21 other states and the District of Columbia in having a minimum wage that exceeds the current federal law minimum of $7.25 per hour. Currently, the state of Washington has the highest minimum wage, coming in at $9.32 per hour.  The U.S. Department of Labor provides a summary of state minimum wage rates on its website: 

In addition to state wage ...

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Earlier this month, President Obama directed the U.S. Department of Labor to update the federal overtime pay regulations by revising the salary component of the executive, administrative, and professional exemptions.  To qualify for these overtime pay exemptions (a.k.a. the white collar exemptions), employees must receive a minimum, guaranteed weekly salary of at least $455 and satisfy a duties test that requires them to primarily perform exempt-level tasks. The Presidents directive was aimed only at the salary component of the white collar exemptions. The currently ...

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From communication methods to office space, technology continues to affect workplace norms. During the week of November 4th, for instance, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case involving the line between technological gear and clothing in the workplace. In the case, steelworkers are seeking to be paid for the time spent putting on flame-retardant jackets and pants, protective leggings, Kevlar sleeves, gloves, steel-toed boots, hard hats, safety glasses, earplugs, and hoods. Under the federal wage and hour law, an employer must pay employees when they engage in a ...

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 Last week, attorneys general of nine states signed a five page letter addressed to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The letter sharply criticizes the EEOCs guidance related to employers use of criminal background checks, and calls the EEOCs position misguided and a gross federal overreach. It accuses the EEOC of attempting to expand Title VIIs protected classes to persons with conviction records.

 
The letter was sent from West Virginias attorney general and signed by the attorneys general of Montana, Alabama, Nebraska, Colorado, South Carolina, Georgia, Utah ...
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The Obama Administration announced on the afternoon of July 2 that it would not penalize employers that do not provide health insurance in 2014. The Affordable Care Act initially required that all employers with more than 50 employees provide coverage to workers or pay significant fines, beginning in 2014. The Treasury Department now says that it will postpone its implementation until 2015, largely due to employers' concerns. Stay tuned for more specifics as the Treasury Department clarifies this and as employers figure out what this means for them going forward.

For an E-Benefits ...

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Click here for a GPM eBenefits Alert on how yesterdays United States Supreme Courts decisions on same-sex marriage will impact employee benefits.

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 Last week the Minnesota House of Representatives passed Ban the Box legislation, which prohibits private employers from asking applicants about their criminal record until after they have been selected for an interview. The bill, Senate File 523, passed easily on a 107-26 vote, with 35 Republican Representatives joining all DFL Representatives voting in support.  Governor Mark Dayton has indicated his support and is expected to sign the bill into law.

With passage of this legislation, Minnesota will be the third state to expand Ban the Box to private employers.  Proponents believe ...

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The United States Supreme Court will be deciding an important affirmative action case this term and has now agreed to hear a second, similar case. These are not employment cases, but the Court's decisions will still be of interest to those of us who advise employers and who have followed the twists and turns of affirmative action over the years. Some observers think that the Court's decision in Fisher is going to signal the end of affirmative action once and for all. Others predict a divided Court and decisions so narrowly tailored that they have no real impact on the future of affirmative ...

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The Minnesota Legislature is in full swing, and as always, employers will want to monitor the proposals under consideration at the Capitol. Bills that may impact employers include:

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This week saw the introduction of a bill in the Minnesota House of Representatives that would outlaw the enforcement of most noncompete agreements in Minnesota. Under the pending legislation, all noncompete agreements would become unenforceable, with just three exceptions. The exceptions provide for very limited enforcement of noncompetition agreements in particular circumstances: in connection with:  the sale of a business, in connection with the dissolution of a partnership, and in connection with the withdrawal of membership in a limited liability company. 
Although ...
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Three states held votes earlier this month about legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. In two of the three, Washington and Colorado, the measures were approved.  Oregon voters defeated the initiative in their state.  
What does this mean for employers doing business in states where recreational marijuana use is now legal? Its a little too early to tell, it seems, although it appears that at least in Washington, employers can continue to enforce their drug use and drug testing polices as before, at least for the time being.  Our Washington partner in the Employment Law ...
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A new provision of the Minnesota unemployment statute became effective July 1. Enacted by the 2012 legislature, the new language could have an impact on Minnesota employers and employees, but just what that effect might be is not -- to be charitable -- entirely clear.

It is not unusual for an employer to enter into an agreement with the departing employee under which the employee releases potential claims against the employer. To make such an agreement enforceable in a court of law, the employer must provide the departing employee something of value that, without the agreement, the ...

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Its been a big week at the Supreme Court. The health care ruling (available here) is grabbing most of the headlines. While more analysis will be pouring out over the next several weeks, several sources are beginning to provide helpful information for employers:
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Privacy is right on the tip of everyone's tongue again this week.  Delaware proposed its own Facebook privacy law for employers and employees that goes even further than Maryland's recent legislation and  the law currently before Congress.  The FCC released its full report on concerns with Google's gathering of data for their Street View feature on Google maps.  A court in the Eastern District of Virginia ruled that a Facebook "like" is not protected under the First Amendment.  Finally, the New York Times described how users can cover up their searching habits on the web.


Technology and the ...

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This week technology is once again getting people in trouble.  Legislators are concerned with employers' practices of requiring access to employees' social media accounts.  A federal judge has reported himself for ethics review after admitting to sending a racist email.  Some commentators are speculating that Pinterest users could be held liable for their pins.  Check out the links below to make sure technology doesn't get you into hot water.
Technology and the Workplace
Legislators Concerned About Monitoring of Employee, Student Social Media (SoMdNews)

Keeping an Eye on ...

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In Minnesota, a proposed bill is now working its way through the legislature that, if enacted, would make it significantly more difficult for a worker in the construction industry to qualify as an independent contractor, rather than an employee. The current version of this bill includes new, detailed, and restrictive criteria for qualification as an independent contractor.  The new criteria proposed include, among other things, that an independent contractor must maintain a separate business with an office, equipment, and materials, and must incur the main expenses ...

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This week both Washington and the workplace paid close attention to technology.  Congress plans to approve a bill that will auction public airwaves in order to help cover the payroll tax cut extension.  The Federal Trade Commission called for better privacy notices for apps directed at kids.  App developers came under scrutiny by members of Congress after reports that many developers were gathering information from phone address books without the owner's knowledge.  And workplaces are realizing how mobile technology saves both time and money.
Technology and the Workplace
Why ...
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Last Friday, Governor Mark Dayton vetoed four GOP-sponsored litigation reform bills that had been approved by the Minnesota House and Minnesota Senate. We previously posted about these bills, which were aimed at limiting litigation costs and which were the first bills to reach the Governors desk this legislative session. Had they passed, the bills would have: (1) reduced the statute of limitations for filing a lawsuit; (2) limited the recovery of attorneys fees by successful claimants; (3) created stronger appeal rights to challenge a case being designated as a class action; and ...
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Love is in the air this week as Valentine's Day approaches, and technology is in the news as it continues to impact and influence the development of the law.  A Senate committee approved a bill this week that would allow television access to Supreme Court proceedings.  A Texas court upheld the use of a defendant's MySpace page as evidence in his murder conviction.  The country of Brazil filed suit against Twitter to try to block accounts that warn drivers of speed traps and roadblocks.  And just as the law has collided with technology, Cupid's arrow has struck mobile devices everywhere ...

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This week two events have dominated the Web:  Facebook filed for a $5 billion initial public offering, and the New York Giants and New England Patriots are preparing to face off in Super Bowl 46.  But don't get so caught up pondering Mark Zuckerberg's net worth that you overlook the other stories this week concerning technology, the law, and the workplace. Get up to speed on all of it and then pick out your favorite apps for Sunday's big game - the kind for your phone, not your stomach. 
Technology and the Law
Facebook Files for $5 Billion IPO (CNNMoney)
Google Defends Privacy ...
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This week privacy and technology collide once again.  On Monday the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the use of a GPS tracking device placed on a suspect's car constituted a search under the Fourth Amendment.  The FBI indirectly announced plans to monitor social networks when it requested information from contractors who might want to build the monitoring system.  But perhaps the largest privacy concerns this week have come from Facebook's announcement that its Timeline format will soon be mandatory.  So once you finish reading the links below, get a plan ...
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This week was nothing short of historic in the context of technology and the law. Wikipedia, Google, and others blacked out or censored their sites in protest of anti-piracy bills in the House and Senate.  Apple unveiled technology that could change the world of education.  Facebook introduced new apps that help users share even more information about themselves - yes, apparently it is possible. 
Technology and the Law
Internet Blackout Causes 18 Senators to Flee from PIPA (Forbes) (NYTimes) (FastCo)
U.S. Shuts Down MegaUpload, Charges Kim Dotcom, 6 Others with Piracy ...
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This week, instead of looking back, we look ahead to the new year. We certainly expect fascinating court decisions about technology and the workplace.  Employers and employees are keeping in line with the New Years theme of self-improvement by using technology to make themselves and their workplace more efficient.  And new technology is helping individuals achieve their 2012 goals, from weight loss to learning a musical instrument.  So click away and be inspired to make 2012 the best yet.


Technology and the Law
Can a Court Make You Give Up Your Password? (ABC News)
New Fight Breaks Out ...

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In its 2010 Term, the Supreme Court issued a number of interesting opinions on employment law topics such as class action lawsuits (invalidating a class action brought by 1.5 million current or former Wal-Mart employees), retaliation and Title VII (allowing a third-party to bring a retaliation claim because of association under Title VII) and immigration (allowing states to punish employers for hiring unauthorized workers).
The Courts 2011 Term has fewer high-profile employment law cases, but a few cases are worth watching, including:
Hosanna-Tabor Church v. EEOC is of ...
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As Megan Anderson wrote in her post "Does Your Company Have a "Workyard" Bully?," proposed anti-workplace bullying legislation is on the rise across the country.  Earlier this month, the trend made its way to the Land of 10,000 Lakes, as Minnesota became the 21st state to introduce workplace bullying legislation
The legislation, introduced as S.F. No. 1352, has been referred to the Minnesota Senate's Jobs and Economic Growth Committee.  A companion version, H.F. 1701, was introduced in the Minnesota House of Representatives and referred to the House Commerce and Regulatory ...
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You may be wondering what cats have to do with employment law. Well, last week the U.S. Supreme Court recognized the cats paw theory of employment discrimination for the first time, making it easier for employees to prove discrimination and for employers to get burned by legal liability. The phrase cats paw stems from an Aesop fable in which a monkey uses flattery to induce a cat to retrieve roasting chestnuts from a hot fire and then absconds with the chestnuts after the cat has burned its paws. Based on the fable, cats paw refers to a person who is unwittingly used to accomplish another's ...

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