Menu
Blog Banner Image

The Modern Workplace

Posts from March 2021.
Posted in COVID-19, Leave
Here we go again… California has passed new legislation (Senate Bill 95) requiring a larger group of employers to provide paid leave for many more COVID-19-related reasons than previously allowed.
Q: Who must provide the SB 95 leave?

A: California employers (including public entities) with more than 25 employees nationally.

Q. Who is eligible for the SB 95 leave?

A. “Covered employees” is defined as California-based employees who are unable to work or telework for one of the qualifying reasons.[1]
Q. What reasons qualify for the SB 95 leave?
A. There are more qualifying reasons ...
Email LinkedIn Twitter Facebook

An EEO-1 Report must be submitted by all private sector employers with at least 100 employees, or federal contractors with 50 or more employees. This submission has been required for over a half century. Because of the pandemic, the due dates for the submission of the 2019 and 2020 EEO-1 Reports were suspended by the EEOC until March 31, 2021.

Earlier this year the EEOC announced that the EEOC’s collection site for the submission (the EEOC On Line Filing System) will open in April 2021 for an eligible employer’s submission of both the 2019 and 2020 EEO-1 Component 1 workforce ...

Email LinkedIn Twitter Facebook
Posted in COVID-19

On Thursday, March 11, 2021, President Biden signed an historic $1.9 Trillion COVID-19 Relief Package known as the American Rescue Plan Act. You may be (rightfully) thinking, “wow, that’s a lot of money, what’s in it for me?!” In fact, many Americans will receive direct stimulus checks aimed at helping to offset widespread economic strain caused by the pandemic. Whether you use the money to pay overdue bills or towards a new car is up to you, and either way the economy will theoretically be improved. In addition to the personal funds the federal government is sending to millions ...

Email LinkedIn Twitter Facebook

By now, we are all familiar with the routine employee handbook disclaimer: 

This Handbook is provided for informational purposes only and is not a contract between the Company and any employee. 

Even with such a disclaimer in place, though, employers should be thoughtful when drafting and implementing detailed policies, particularly wage-related policies, as highlighted by a recent case out of Minnesota. In Minnesota, courts have often refused to construe an employee handbook as a contract when it contains a conspicuous contract disclaimer. In Hall v. City of Plainview, though ...

Email LinkedIn Twitter Facebook

Topics

Archives

Blog Authors

Recent Posts